Yarn

Where’s my crebit card..?

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Babe, have you seen my crebit card? I need to make a yarn purchase…

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I’ll be visiting Knitpicks later, gotta get get that yarn yarn yaaarnn!!

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A look into the life of a Jaunty Bear

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A Jaunty bear is something of a treasure. Something to be respected, held close to your heart and protected from unsavory influences. If you should meet a jaunty bear, do not play dead or run away, instead invite him to lunch and a walk in the park. You should count yourself lucky to befriend such a creature, don’t ruin the opportunity with fears or doubts.

happy happy joy joy
Jaunty bears like to knit, dance, and wear sweaters.

 

To help you in the process of fitting in with and befriending the bears, I present to you … Bear Ridge Scarf. Now I’ve never met a real jaunty bear in person (or a grumpy bear, for that matter) but from what I understand a lot of them live in places that can get pretty cold. I know they have fur and all that but some bears may be more sensitive to cold than others and need an extra layer or two. Humans differ, after all, so why not bears? Maybe grumpy bears are just uncomfortably cold bears. Besides, if a bear did want to wear a scarf, I’m pretty sure it would look something like this; simple, elegant, classy and cool. Ok, ok, without further hubbub, here is the Bear Ridge Scarf and pattern.

 

The Bear Ridge Scarf is a shallow, triangular scarf knit back and forth in garter stitch. It features a small picot edging along the two bottom edges. 
sooo cozy!
bear scarf is about 12″ deep and 52″ wide

 

 

Here’s what I used:
1 pair of size 9 circular knitting needles, 32″
1 darning needle or crochet hook for weaving in ends
2 skeins Noro Silk Garden (45% Silk, 45% Kid Mohair, 10% Lambswool) in colorway #349

You can use 220 yards of any worsted weight yarn you’d like, sky’s the limit!

What’s my gauge again?

Gauge is not important with this project. If you don’t want to use a worsted yarn, just make sure you adjust your needle to a size appropriate for the yarn you end up choosing.

Here’s how I did it:

CO 3 sts

Row 1: knit

Row 2: Using the cabled cast on method CO3, BO1, knit until the end of the row.

Row 3-?: Repeat row 2 until your scarf is as large as you would like it or until you run out of yarn, leaving some yarn for BO (if you want to be a rebel, knit yourself out of yarn and BO using the crochet hook method) and weave in those nasty ends.

 

Block your scarf by pinning your picots out and steaming the hey out of it (trust me, blocking this project makes a world of difference).

 

Wear and enjoy! My favorite way to wear it is modeled below but feel free to be your own person and make your own decisions on the matter. Don’t worry, we’ll still be friends.

Rararararrr!
Blending in with bears

 

Grrraaararararrr
Obligatory bear pin (to indicate I am friend, not foe)

 

scarfs have ridges!
Bear Ridge namesake: garter stitch for days!

Thrifting for Gold

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I’ve always known I could reuse yarn from a garment at the Goodwill by unraveling and reconditioning the yarn but I haven’t tried it… Until now!

I found this hat… Slouch.. Beret.. Thing. It’s pinky and greeny and waaaay too big for any human I’ve ever met. Looked like this:

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I undid the bind off at the top and began the adventure of unraveling.

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I wound it onto my niddy noddy, soaked it, hung it to dry and ended up with about 150 yards of dk weight, seemingly hand dyed, super soft yarn! Now I just have to decide what to use it for…

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