knit

I’m just so excited…

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Hello dear readers, I have fantastic news and some super cool links to share with you today…

♥I’m published! I’m published! I’m published! I’m published! I’m published!♥

At the book store
That’s my hat, in a real live magazine!

My first published pattern is available for purchase from a news stand near you! Details and pictures are as follows, enjoy.

Knitscene loves me!
Photo: Knitscene/Harper Point

 

Below is a list of things you can do related to the Heliotrope Hat published in Knitscene Winter 2013!

  • Check out the Ravelry page! (Add it to your queue while you’re there)
  • Purchase a copy of Knitscene at a bookstore or online!
  • Get yarn to knit it with!
  • Knit it!
  • Wear it!
  • Tell people how much you love it and share with them this great list of things!
  • Repeat!
So cute!
The first hat, originally called Pathfinder

 Stay tuned for more crafty goodness!

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Temporary Failures Drive Success

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As you may or may not know, I have been on one serious knit pattern submission kick. Most recently, I sent away my Dana Leigh Cardigan (DLC) for consideration. Unfortunately it was not one of the chosen ones for the collection up for jury but I won’t be letting that get me down. The plan is to work and re-work the pattern so it turns into something so perfectly fabulous it will have to be chosen somewhere! Great plan, right? I thought so, too.

So dotty!
DLC submission materials, plum with lime green dots!

Don’t worry, I know that my designs don’t suck just because they don’t fit into a collection for one reason or another, I’m not that silly. It’s a temporary failure that will lead to success down the road. As long as I learn from the feedback I get from publishers and collection curators, I can’t lose. In the meantime, I’ve got this gal telling me to knit, knit, knit!

Knit knit knit!
Knitmaster Freyja, on the look out for slackers

Check back this week, I’ll be posting a couple of free hat patterns to get your creative juices flowing. Free patterns will include a simple ribbed beanie with the sleekest decreases ever and a cute knit hat with simple stranded hearts. Adorable!

I’ve got to go for now, this little lady needs me to crochet her a sunhat for the warming weather!

Boop
My head is looking particularly hatless today, would you say?

A look into the life of a Jaunty Bear

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A Jaunty bear is something of a treasure. Something to be respected, held close to your heart and protected from unsavory influences. If you should meet a jaunty bear, do not play dead or run away, instead invite him to lunch and a walk in the park. You should count yourself lucky to befriend such a creature, don’t ruin the opportunity with fears or doubts.

happy happy joy joy
Jaunty bears like to knit, dance, and wear sweaters.

 

To help you in the process of fitting in with and befriending the bears, I present to you … Bear Ridge Scarf. Now I’ve never met a real jaunty bear in person (or a grumpy bear, for that matter) but from what I understand a lot of them live in places that can get pretty cold. I know they have fur and all that but some bears may be more sensitive to cold than others and need an extra layer or two. Humans differ, after all, so why not bears? Maybe grumpy bears are just uncomfortably cold bears. Besides, if a bear did want to wear a scarf, I’m pretty sure it would look something like this; simple, elegant, classy and cool. Ok, ok, without further hubbub, here is the Bear Ridge Scarf and pattern.

 

The Bear Ridge Scarf is a shallow, triangular scarf knit back and forth in garter stitch. It features a small picot edging along the two bottom edges. 
sooo cozy!
bear scarf is about 12″ deep and 52″ wide

 

 

Here’s what I used:
1 pair of size 9 circular knitting needles, 32″
1 darning needle or crochet hook for weaving in ends
2 skeins Noro Silk Garden (45% Silk, 45% Kid Mohair, 10% Lambswool) in colorway #349

You can use 220 yards of any worsted weight yarn you’d like, sky’s the limit!

What’s my gauge again?

Gauge is not important with this project. If you don’t want to use a worsted yarn, just make sure you adjust your needle to a size appropriate for the yarn you end up choosing.

Here’s how I did it:

CO 3 sts

Row 1: knit

Row 2: Using the cabled cast on method CO3, BO1, knit until the end of the row.

Row 3-?: Repeat row 2 until your scarf is as large as you would like it or until you run out of yarn, leaving some yarn for BO (if you want to be a rebel, knit yourself out of yarn and BO using the crochet hook method) and weave in those nasty ends.

 

Block your scarf by pinning your picots out and steaming the hey out of it (trust me, blocking this project makes a world of difference).

 

Wear and enjoy! My favorite way to wear it is modeled below but feel free to be your own person and make your own decisions on the matter. Don’t worry, we’ll still be friends.

Rararararrr!
Blending in with bears

 

Grrraaararararrr
Obligatory bear pin (to indicate I am friend, not foe)

 

scarfs have ridges!
Bear Ridge namesake: garter stitch for days!

Mistake Rib Scarf

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As I mentioned in a previous post this delightful yellow scarf is the first finished object made from my own handspun yarn. With beautifully dyed wool from spinningtheweb on etsy (I highly recommend her shop) I managed to make a gorgeous skein of 2-ply yarn which as you see here has been made into a wonderfully simple scarf to keep my giraffe neck warm against the icy Pacific Winds of Santa Cruz. Once oh so cold, now ever so toasty. 🙂

Banana Scarf
You too could don a scarf such as this!

Now, as my loyal readers (at this point, probably just Gramma. Hey Gramma!) I offer you an easy to follow knitting pattern that, with varying yarns and needles, will yield spectacularly varying results!

banana scarf yields gelato
Disclaimer: pattern does not include production of ice cream.

Behold, the Mistake Rib Scarf pattern:

Any yarn with any coordinating set of needles. For this version I used worsted-bulky handspun yarn and size 11 needles with an initial cast on of 13 sts (116 yds makes a 5 ft scarf).

CO any number of odd stitches
Work each row (k2, p2)
Knit until you have no more yarn or until you’ve reached the desired length.

Wrap it around your neck or that of a loved one and enjoy it’s warmth and let the love begin!